Careers

Brutal Simplicity of thought

  • 1 Feb \ Cape Town

    Radio Drama Production Company

    Project BackgroundThe goal of the KP REACH programme is the reduction in HIV infections and HIV-related deaths among key populations in Southern Africa through improved access to HIV prevention, testing and treatment services. We are working with sex workers (SW), men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender people (TG) and women who have sex with women (WSW). As part of this programme, we are working on a communications campaign to address the stigma and discrimination faced by people on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work. The more stigma and discrimination people from these communities experience in their daily lives from family, friends, neighbours, co-workers and healthcare professions, the less likely they are to feel safe accessing vital HIV prevention and treatment services. Forms of stigma and discrimination include exclusion and isolation, verbal abuse and physical violence.

    Communications StrategyWe conducted research to see what stories and messages would be most likely to reduce stigma and discrimination. We found that when we share stories about human rights violations, there are people who empathise with these stories, however we also found that these stories are unlikely to change behaviour as they reinforce current social norms (i.e. I believe that people like me are stigmatising and discriminating against these groups, so I should too so as not to stand out). Human beings are social animals and behavioural change theory demonstrates that we are more likely to behave according to a social norm than we are our own individual attitudes or even the law! Therefore, our campaign will aim to show the other side: the unheard stories of people who are gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender or sex workers and their friends, family, co-workers, neighbours, teachers, religious and community leaders and healthcare providers who have come to accept them for who they are over time. Research showed the stories most likely to change behaviours are ones where the audience can identify with people like themselves who may have struggled with someone’s sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work at first but have become more accepting and supportive over time. The more people see that people like them are behaving in this way, the less likely they are to feel that they should discriminate against these groups as a default.

    The Brief: We want to create a radio drama (13 x 5-minute episodes) in each of the 5 countries: South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Malawi*. The objective of the radio drama is to reduce levels of stigma and discrimination experienced by people because of their sexual orientation, gender identity or profession of sex work. The overall outtake we want people to have from the drama is that there are people like them who are behaving more positively towards people with different sexual orientations, gender identities and sex workers. The impact we’d like to have is that stigma and discrimination doesn’t become the default behaviour because people think that is how others like themselves do and should behave. We want to show people there is another way. The focus of the drama should be portraying stories of people who have become more accepting of a person in their life who may be gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender or make money from sex work. It is really important that we show people struggling to come to come to terms with this over time as if they come around overnight then the audience cannot identify with this storyline. These people could be friends, family, co-workers (e.g. hotel staff working in close proximity to sex workers), neighbours, teachers, religious and community leaders or healthcare providers. We want to focus on stories that portray people from lower socio-economic backgrounds in rural and/or urban areas. Research suggests that the following are key ingredients of a good story:

    1.) Focus on a relationship with a family member, friend, co-worker, community leader or teacher who has become more open-minded or supportive over time. Research showed the stories most likely to change behaviours are ones where they can identify with people like themselves who may have struggled with someone’s sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work at first but have become more accepting and supportive over time.

    2.) Include the perspectives of both the LGBT person/Sex Worker and the person in their life who has come to embrace them for who they are over time. It is really important that both perspectives are heard and that the LGBT person or Sex Worker is shown as having agency rather than being passive in storyline.

    3.) Show the real face of acceptance. Real acceptance often shows itself in small behaviours that signal acceptance and respect rather than in a single shining moment. Don’t sugar coat it and include the struggle – otherwise people can’t relate.

    4.) Highlights key realisations on change journey of person who went from rejecter to acceptor. Examples include:

    • Recognition that LGBT person/Sex Worker is still the person they knew and cared for.
    • Recognition of our common humanity (not just what makes us different). E.g. Lots of us want the same things in life – to find love, to play an active part in our communities, to be able to pay our bills and give our children a good start in life etc.
    • Empathy through common experience (lots of us have unfortunately experienced stigma and discrimination because of our race, religion, ethnicity, gender etc). When we remind people of this and position stigma and discrimination as a common enemy then this helps drive empathy.
    • Another realisation that might be worth exploring as part of one storyline is that different sexual orientations, gender identities have a long history in Africa and are not ‘new’/or ‘unAfrican’ – in fact it was stigma and discrimination that was the foreign import thanks to penal laws brought in from colonialism.

    5.) Provides convincing positive counter-narrative, that enables people to still feel that this new position of open-mindedness aligns with their values. For example, when people in research spoke about reconciling with a friend, family member etc who is gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender or a sex worker they spoke about some of the following values that guided their actions:

    • A belief that unconditional love for a child being more important.
    • A belief that we do not have the right to judge others (often a value stemming from their religious upbringing).
    • Putting the bible’s focus on love and inclusion first (this came through in stories from church leaders who had welcomed people back into the fold).

    Talking about these values partly helps people reconcile their new open-mindedness with their existing beliefs and also helps them justify their position to others.

    Please note:

    In 3 of the 4 countries the dramas criminalize against one or more of the groups we are working with and we need to be sensitive to that. It is important that the drama does not attempt to engage in legal change. Our focus is on reducing stigma and discrimination because we know it is a barrier to accessing vital HIV prevention and treatment services.

    Mandatories:

    • We need to cover stories that affect gay men, lesbian women, transgender people and sex workers across the 13 episodes. This means there should be a minimum of 4 main storylines per drama.
    • We will have a drama in each of the four countries. We must cast voices indigenous to the country it will be aired in (with a focus on people who can portray people from lower socio-economic backgrounds). Please note, in South Africa the drama needs to be relevant for people listening in Swaziland and Lesotho.
    • We want a variety of acceptors (e.g. parents, grandparents, friend, person in wider community, co-worker, traditional leader/religious leader, doctor or nurse).

    Budget:

    The budget is no more than R3 000 000,00.

    NDA:

    Due to the sensitive nature of this content, please may we ask that you sign an NDA, for us to keep on record.

    Your Submission:

    Your submission should include the following:

    1.) Technical submission (max 15 pages)

    • Creative Concept for the Radio Drama and how it will work across 4 different countries
    • Why your organization is well-equipped to create and produce these radio dramas (i.e. organization’s credentials and past performance)
    • How you will ensure authenticity (i.e. stories feel believable)
    • Please provide timelines for this project, from concept development, to screenwriting, to pre-production, production and post-production. The end live date needs to be 1 June 2018.

    (30 points)

    2.) Financial Submission

    • Budget that includes all costs from creative development and scriptwriting to production and getting the radio dramas ready to be live on air in June.

    (20 points)

    The deadline for submission is: 16 February 2018 by 18:00 GMT.

    All proposals must be submitted electronically to WSprocurement@mcsaatchi.com. Technical and financial proposals should be submitted separately (as two separate documents in one email), labelled as follows:

    KPREACH Radio Drama Tehnicalproposal

    KPREACH Radio Drama Financialproposal.

    Please note that proposals received after the deadline and submissions where the technical and financial proposals have not been submitted as separate documents will not be considered.

     

    Thank you.

    WSprocurement@mcsaatchi.com
  • 1 Feb \ Cape Town

    Radio Ad Production Company

    Project Background: The goal of the KP REACH programme is the reduction in HIV infections and HIV-related deaths among key populations in Southern Africa through improved access to HIV prevention, testing and treatment services. We are working with sex workers (SW), men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender people (TG) and women who have sex with women (WSW). As part of this programme, we are working on a communications campaign to address the stigma and discrimination faced by people on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work. The more stigma and discrimination people from these communities’ experience in their daily lives from family, friends, neighbours, co-workers and healthcare professions, the less likely they are to feel safe accessing vital HIV prevention and treatment services. Forms of stigma and discrimination include exclusion and isolation, verbal abuse and physical violence.

    Communications StrategyWe conducted research to see what stories and messages would be most likely to reduce stigma and discrimination. We found that when we share stories about human rights violations, there are people who empathise with these stories, however we also found that these stories are unlikely to change behaviour as they reinforce current social norms (i.e. I believe that people like me are stigmatising and discriminating against these groups, so I should too so as not to stand out). Human beings are social animals and behavioural change theory demonstrates that we are more likely to behave according to a social norm than we are our own individual attitudes or even the law! Therefore, our campaign will aim to show the other side: the unheard stories of people who are gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender or sex workers and their friends, family, co-workers, neighbours, teachers, religious and community leaders and healthcare providers who have come to accept them for who they are over time. Research showed the stories most likely to change behaviours are ones where the audience can identify with people like themselves who may have struggled with someone’s sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work at first but have become more accepting and supportive over time. The more people see that people like them are behaving in this way, the less likely they are to feel that they should discriminate against these groups as a default.

    The Ask:

    • Record and mix 33 x 60” Radio Ads.
    • Translation of 1x generic script into South Sotho, Afrikaans, Zulu, Chewa and Oshiwambo, as well as 4 x KP specific scripts into South Sotho and Zulu. For ease, we have a radio ad breakdown of the radio ads below, and which ads needs to be translated into what languages.
    • Sourcing of 93 x voices to read the scripts, plus performance fees and usages for 1 year in 8 countries, as well as usages for online. Please see voice artist requirements below.
    • Music licenses – campaign fee.
    • Studio costs for +/- 2 weeks of recording and mixing.
    • Have all radio ads ready to be live for 12 March (launch date).
    • Submit a timing plan to show how you are able to meet the deadline, from voice artist selection, to translations, to recording, to mixing, to delivering of final material.

    Radio Ads:

    Please see the 5 x Radio Scripts, 1 x generic, and 4 x KP Specific Ads-

    Generic -

    ANNOUNCER: When did you fail as a parent?

    FVO: I failed as a parent when I found out that my son was transgender… and I didn’t protect her from those who caused her pain.

    FVO: I failed as a parent, when I learnt that my son was gay… and I kicked him out the house.

    MVO: I failed as a parent when my daughter came out as a lesbian, and I forgot that she deserved to be happy.

    MVO: When I found out that my daughter was a sex worker… and I forgot that she was just working hard to make a good life

    ANNOUNCER: Hear how these parents, and so many others, have overcome their differences to reconnect with their loved ones on unheardvoices.africa. Tens of thousands of these stories of hope exist, from big gestures to smaller moments of support. Share one of our stories or your own, and together we can make these stories of hope, heard.

    KP Specific: Lesbian -

    FVO: My sister told me that she was a lesbian. She’d changed. Everything had changed. What I didn’t realise was that she was still the same wonderful, kind, amazing woman that she’d always been. After I stopped talking to her, she lived a happy life. She finished her studies, she got a good job, bought a home, and made a life with her wife. Now I can never make it right – I wasted 13 years mourning her death while she was still alive. Now she’s passed away and I can never get that time back.

    ANNOUNCER: Hear how this sister, and so many others, have overcome their prejudices on unheardvoices.africa. Tens of thousands of these stories of hope exist, from big gestures to smaller moments of support. Share one of our stories or your own, and together we can make these stories of hope, heard.

    KP Specific: Sex worker –

    MVO: When my daughter became a sex worker, she lost all her morals. I said. For years I didn’t speak to her, but over time I realised that sex work is still work. I’d taught her never to give up, that success took hard work, and to be there for her family. She’d done everything I taught her, maybe not the way I would have liked, but she’s done it. Now it’s time to for me to stop judging her.

    ANNOUNCER: Hear how this father, and so many others, have overcome their differences to reconnect with their loved ones on unheardvoices.africa. Tens of thousands of these stories of hope exist, from big gestures to smaller moments of support. Share one of our stories or your own, and together we can make these stories of hope, heard.

    KP Specific: Transgender -

    TRANS VO: You can’t decide to be a man, when you’re a woman. They say. I say that they’re wrong. At first, my father tried to change me. He said that you can’t just decide you’re a man, if you’re born a woman. He’d force my mother to make me beautiful dresses, he forced me to grow my hair long and wear make up. But eventually, my mother convinced him that it just wasn’t going to work. And slowly, very slowly, he realised that I wasn’t the daughter he expected, but I could be the son he never had.

    ANNOUNCER: Hear how this person’s parents, and so many others, have overcome their differences to reconnect with their loved ones on unheardvoices.africa. Tens of thousands of these stories of hope exist, from big gestures to smaller moments of support. Share one of our stories or your own, and together we can make these stories of hope, heard.

    KP Specific: Gay -

    MVO: Poor man, his son is gay. He must feel like such a failure. Said the neighbours. And at first, I thought I was a failure too. I kicked my son out of the house, banished him from his childhood home. Until I realised that I had taught him to love, to care, and to be kind. I raised him to be someone that I could be proud of and he is. Just because he’s is a different kind of man, doesn’t make him less of a man.

    ANNOUNCER: Hear how this father, and so many others, have overcome their differences to reconnect with their loved ones on unheardvoices.africa. Tens of thousands of these stories of hope exist, from big gestures to smaller moments of support. Share one of our stories or your own, and together we can make these stories of hope, heard.

    Radio Ad Breakdown:

    Generic Ad (60” including 5 voices)

    • English in SA voices
    • South Sotho in SA voices
    • Afrikaans in SA voices
    • Zulu in SA voices
    • English in Malawi voices
    • English in Botswana voices
    • Oshiwambo in Namibia voices
    • English in Namibia voices

    Lesbian Ad (60” including 2 voices)

    • English in SA voices
    • South Sotho in SA voices
    • Zulu in SA voices
    • English in Malawi voices
    • English in Botswana voices
    • English in Namibia voices

    Gay Ad (60” including 2 voices)

    • English in SA voices
    • South Sotho in SA voices
    • Zulu in SA voices
    • English in Malawi voices
    • English in Botswana voices
    • English in Namibia voices

    Transgender Ad (60” including 2 voices)

    • English in SA voices
    • South Sotho in SA voices
    • Zulu in SA voices
    • English in Malawi voices
    • English in Botswana voices
    • English in Namibia voices

    Sex Worker Ad (60” including 2 voices)

    • English in SA voices
    • South Sotho in SA voices
    • Zulu in SA voices
    • English in Malawi voices
    • English in Botswana voices
    • English in Namibia voices

    Voices:

    Overall

    • We must avoid any recognizable voices for safety and security reasons.
    • All voices must be native to the country – we want to avoid diaspora/migrants living in country where people will detect that they are not fully ‘from here’.

    Announcer

    • The Announcer will be the same across all 5 x scripts for specific country/language
    • We are open to a male or female voice
    • Although it says ‘announcer’ in the script we think it is better guidance to think of this person as an interviewer who is in conversation with the people sharing their stories. Someone who has the skills to encourage people to share their stories. Their tone should be warm, empathetic and encouraging. For example, in the generic script where they say (when did you fail as a parent?) this must not sound judgmental or critical. It should sound like a radio interviewer staring a conversation that may be hard for people she is talking to.
    • We want to avoid: 1.) An advertising style of read – the end announcement should feel like the conclusion read by an interviewer affected by the stories they have heard. Not an advertising voice plugging something. 2.) Creating hierarchical relationship between voices sharing stories / interviewer. They should feel like they are having an equal conversation rather than one person carrying all the gravitas and authority. 3.) Classic stereotypes – authoritative voice / wise sage etc.

    Voices sharing stories

    • The most important thing is authenticity. We are telling real stories and we are only using actors to protect people’s identity.
    • All voices should sound natural / conversational / intimate and reflective. We don’t want actor/advertising intonation where sentences feel over rehearsed or over thought.
    • We want to focus on voices from lower social economic background and avoid voices that would be perceived as coming from privileged groups in society. This is important as often people who have higher economic status face less stigma and are better able to negotiate safe spaces for themselves. We do not want to leave the most disadvantaged behind.

    Voices we need:

    • 4 x specific scripts: MVO – father of sex worker (same voice for sex worker / generic scripts), MVO – father of gay son, FVO – sister of lesbian, MVO – trans man, Announcer (same one throughout all ads)
    • Generic Script: MVO – father of sex worker (same voice for sex worker / generic scripts), FVO – mother of transwoman, FVO – mother of gay son, MVO – father of lesbian daughter, Announcer (same one throughout all ads)

    Usages:

    1 year usage on various radio stations in 8 Southern African Countries (SA, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi) – usage based on standard territory percentage as per PMA ruling. Please also note that we will be using these ads on the web too, so please also cost for this in your usages for 1 year. These also may be played in taxis, so if this is a different usage rate, please also include this in your costing.

    NDA:

    Due to the sensitive nature of this content, please may we ask that you sign an NDA, for us to keep on record.

    Budget:

    The budget is R1 200 000 including VAT.

    Your Submission:

    Your submission should include the following:

    1.) Technical submission (max 5 pages)

    • Why your organization or audio studio is well-equipped to record and deliver the radio spots (i.e. organization’s/studios credentials and past performance)
    • How you will ensure authenticity (i.e. stories feel believable)

    (30 points)

    2.) Financial Submission

    • Budget that includes all mentioned above in the ask section.

    (20 points)

    The deadline for submission is: 9 February 2018 by 18:00 GMT.

    All proposals must be submitted electronically to WSprocurement@mcsaatchi.com Technical and financial proposals should be submitted separately (as two separate documents in one email), labelled as follows:

    • KPREACH Radio Ad Technical proposal
    • KPREACH Radio Ad Financial proposal.

      

    Thank you.

    WSprocurement@mcsaatchi.com
  • 1 Feb \ Cape Town

    Photographer

    • Project Background: The goal of the KP REACH programme is the reduction in HIV infections and HIV-related deaths among key populations in Southern Africa through improved access to HIV prevention, testing and treatment services. We are working with sex workers (SW), men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender people (TG) and women who have sex with women (WSW). As part of this programme, we are working on a communications campaign to address the stigma and discrimination faced by people on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work. The more stigma and discrimination people from these communities’ experience in their daily lives from family, friends, neighbours, co-workers and healthcare professions, the less likely they are to feel safe accessing vital HIV prevention and treatment services. Forms of stigma and discrimination include exclusion and isolation, verbal abuse and physical violence.

    Communications Strategy: We conducted research to see what stories and messages would be most likely to reduce stigma and discrimination. We found that when we share stories about human rights violations, there are people who empathise with these stories, however we also found that these stories are unlikely to change behaviour as they reinforce current social norms (i.e. I believe that people like me are stigmatising and discriminating against these groups, so I should too so as not to stand out). Human beings are social animals and behavioural change theory demonstrates that we are more likely to behave according to a social norm than we are our own individual attitudes or even the law! Therefore, our campaign will aim to show the other side: the unheard stories of people who are gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender or sex workers and their friends, family, co-workers, neighbours, teachers, religious and community leaders and healthcare providers who have come to accept them for who they are over time. Research showed the stories most likely to change behaviours are ones where the audience can identify with people like themselves who may have struggled with someone’s sexual orientation, gender identity or sex work at first but have become more accepting and supportive over time. The more people see that people like them are behaving in this way, the less likely they are to feel that they should discriminate against these groups as a default.

    Campaign Overview: Throughout Africa, people who are Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgender or are Sex Workers, are hated, abused and victimised. This is just the way things are, it’s the “norm”. And even when it isn’t, even when there is understanding and acceptance, people don’t talk about it out of fear. It’s time to change that. It’s time to tell a different side of the story. That for every act of intolerance, hate, and violence, there’s an act of understanding, compassion, and care. Tens of thousands of these stories of hope exist, from big gestures to smaller moments of support. We’re making them famous.

    PhotographyOur imagery will be used to bring our stories to life. Three buckets of imagery will give us enough scope to keep content interesting, but allow the images to relate to each story. These will be used on flyers, on social media and on our website. Please note, these images will need to work across 8 Southern African countries (South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Malawi), so models will need to be a range of African, and the images will need to be angled or cropped so as not to be identifiable as any specific ethnicity. We also can’t reveal the identity of the models for security reasons. We will need to cast locally, but allow for a range of skin tones.

    Photography Buckets:

    • Family and friends, colleagues and community members embracing one another, or sharing a caring, tender moment.
    • Hands
    • Mouths

    Photography Style:

    • Black and white
    • High contrast
    • On a white background

    Photography Shot List – Stories:

    • For Sex Worker: Old man embracing daughter from the side. (Fatherly.)
    • For Trans: One “girl” hand lifting up a “boy” by the hand.
    • For Lesbian: Back of youngish man with his head bowed.
    • For Gay: Older man’s hand on shoulder of younger man. Close up. And older man and younger man walking together. From behind.

    Photography Shot List – General:

    Embracing/Tender moment:

    • Mother and daughter embracing, side-on shot.
    • Mother and son embracing, side-on shot.
    • Father and son embracing, side-on shot.
    • Father and daughter embracing, side-on shot.
    • Mother and daughter in a side-embrace, shot from behind.
    • Mother and son in a side-embrace, shot from behind.
    • Father and daughter in a side-embrace, shot from behind.
    • Same-age women walking together, shot from behind.
    • Same-age men walking together, shot from behind.
    • Same-age man and woman walking together, shot from behind

    Hands:

    • Father and daughter holding hands.
    • Mother and daughter holding hands.
    • Mother and son holding hands.
    • Father with hand on son’s back.
    • Father with hand on daughter’s shoulder.
    • Mother with hand on son’s shoulder.
    • Brother with hand on sister’s shoulder.
    • Sister with hand on brother’s arm.
    • Double hand-hold – two hands grasping one. Non-familial.
    • Non-familial pair of hands in a handshake – male hands.

    Mouths:

    • 10 of the characters.

    Casting:

    • Our cast needs to be authentic. Casting within the KP network should be a primary concern.
    • But we’re casting locally, for all territories.
    • We need to cast locally for a wide range of African skin tones.
    • We need to be representative, so differing body types, skin tones, hair styles.
    • But not too culturally identifiable – no cultural markings, too thin or too tall or too dark.
    • A lot of the shot list will dictate age range and gender.
    • Child-parent pairing should range within 20 to 30 for the child and 50 to 60 for the adult.
    • Otherwise we need to represent a wide range of ages, too, for community and generic acceptors – 20 to 80-years-old.
    • Consider that, in the interest of being representative, the cast should be a mix of urban and rural-based.

    Styling & Grooming:

    • The idea is that our models look natural.
    • Grooming and makeup to be simple. Keep in mind we’re shooting for high contrast, so whatever tricks necessary to give skin and hair good shine and shape.
    • Wardrobe also to be simple. The main factor is to keep in mind we’re shooting for black and white. So colours that read well – blacks, whites, greys, reds. But not solid dark colours as this will come across as a solid block in our treatment. Err toward white or light greys, maybe some simple patterns like stripes. Nothing that can be identified region or culture (no African prints, generic style of clothing). Fairly western-based.

    Usages:

    1 year usage for Website, social, posters & flyers.

    Budget:

    The budget is R300 000,00 (Incl. Casting, Talent fees, Retouching, Catering & Insurance)

    NDA:

    Due to the sensitive nature of this content, please may we ask that you sign an NDA, for us to keep on record.

    Your Submission:

    Your submission should include the following:

    1.) Technical submission (max 5 pages)

    • Creative Concept for the Stills Photography and how it will work across 8 different countries.
    • Why your organisation or Photographer is well-equipped to shoot the images (i.e. organization’s/ photographer’s credentials and past performance)
    • How you will ensure authenticity (i.e. stories feel believable)
    • Please provide a timing plan, of all milestone dates throughout the process, e.g. When you plan on doing casting, pre-production, shoot dates, retouching, and supplying of the finalised images. We need the finalised images to be supplied to us by 2 March latest.

    2.) Financial Submission

    • Budget that includes all costs from shot list, to casting, to photoshoot, location fees, retouching etc. 

    Timings:

    • The deadline for submission is: 9 February 2018 by 18:00 GMT.
    • All proposals must be submitted electronically to WSprocurement@mcsaatchi.com
    • Technical and financial proposals should be submitted separately (as two separate documents in one email), labelled as follows:

    KPREACH Photography Technical proposal

    KPREACH Photography Financial proposal.

     

     Thank you.

    WSprocurement@mcsaatchi.com